About MACED

The Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) partners with local people to build upon the strengths of Kentucky and Central Appalachia. We create economic alternatives and strive to make Appalachian communities better places to live.

Enterprise Development

Small business owners and entrepreneurs are the foundation of our economy. They need financial support, training and encouragement to follow their dreams. MACED provides these critical resources to turn those dreams into reality.

MACED helps businesses and nonprofit enterprises that are committed to building sustainable and vibrant local economies in Central Appalachia. We are looking for viable enterprises that may have trouble finding bank financing, but are contributing to the employment and economic vitality of the region.

Since 1976, MACED has contributed to the growth, financial stability and long-term success of many enterprises. Our staff is experienced in helping companies reach their goals by providing loans, assistance with business planning, and managerial and technical support.

Our Service Area

MACED's service area is in Kentucky and Central Appalachia, with a focus on the 54 Appalachian counties in Kentucky as designated by the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC).

Adair
Bath
Bell
Boyd
Breathitt
Casey
Carter
Clark
Clay
Clinton
Cumberland
Edmonson
Elliott
Estill
Fleming
Floyd
Garrard
Green
Greenup
Harlan
Hart
Jackson
Johnson
Knott
Knox
Laurel
Lawrence
Lee
Leslie
Letcher
Lewis
Lincoln
Metcalfe
McCreary
Madison
Magoffin
Martin
Menifee
Monroe
Montgomery
Morgan
Nicholas
Owsley
Perry
Pike
Powell
Pulaski
Robertson
Rockcastle
Rowan
Russell
Wayne
Whitley
Wolfe

Appalachian Transition

Eastern Kentucky and the Central Appalachian region are full of assets. Beautiful and rugged terrain, rich history and culture, diverse and valuable hardwood forests, and skilled people are important parts of the region's identity. While these and other positives define much of who we are, we face long-term and growing challenges.

Coal production in eastern Kentucky is at its lowest level since the 1960s, and the future of the coal industry continues to look gloomy. Lack of job opportunities across the region is an old and growing challenge. Environmental problems—water quality and forest health in particular—remain major problems. Too many young people are forced to leave and not return. Drug abuse impacts too many families.

Many people recognize that we are in a critical time. Today's changing economic realities combined with long-term challenges have combined to create new urgency. Fortunately, there is a growing effort across the region to create a new way forward toward a brighter Appalachian future. We call this intentional effort Appalachian Transition.

This transition will take a strong and growing vision of an Appalachian future, one that results in real economic opportunities and a higher quality of life. We believe a more diverse and bottom-up economy—one that is more locally owned, based on our assets, driven by thousands of entrepreneurs and that benefits our residents broadly—is possible. Locally owned and operated enterprises can be at the heart of it, providing more decent jobs through sectors like energy efficiency, local foods, sustainable forestry, tourism and healthcare. We believe our natural assets—our forests, mountains, air and water—need to be better protected and can play an important role in this new economy. We believe a strong economy that works better for people in need requires effective local government and good state policy, honest leadership and real public input. We see a region built on the best of its past, that can see a better future ahead and is willing to do the hard work to get there.

These pages aim to share ideas and lift up examples of what it will take to move us toward a brighter Appalachian future.